Alex, you must not know the CAALAS Youth Justice Advocacy …

Comment on Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS by Careful with that Jibe, Eugene.

Alex, you must not know the CAALAS Youth Justice Advocacy Programme co-ordinator.
Part-time or not, she’s one person in Alice town who could not ever be accused of not working extremely hard, with great intelligence and diligence, on these issues.
She displays a great sense of responsibility in her work. She also has a demonstrated ability to ask recalcitrant parents the hard questions.

Careful with that Jibe, Eugene Also Commented

Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
Alex, of course one part-time worker with CAALAS is not able to, in your words, “work closely with EVERY SINGLE young person going throughout Central Australian court system, their family, community, lawyer, school and other service-providers to provide the young person with the support they need to get back on track and stay out of trouble”.
That is exactly my point, and why it is wrong for you to lay the blame on that worker, as you did when you wrote “if your PART-TIME advocacy programme co-ordinator did her job after this child’s court appearance in March, then he wouldn’t have appeared in court again in May.”
As I said earlier: That advocacy programme co-ordinator performed her job with great diligence and dedication, and cannot be held to blame for any alleged failure of duty of care, as the case load of such cases far exceeds the ability of one worker to cover even a small proportion of them. She was doing her job very well, covering as many of the cases as she could, but she wasn’t a magician. So your cheap jibe at her reputation is wrongly placed, and you should withdraw it.


Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
Evelyne Roullet, Posted June 22, 2017 at 1:42 pm: Ralph was not talking about where or how the kid should be housed. He was referring to the bigger issue of the huge trauma in his life, caused by the alleged killing of his mother by his father. Kids who experience this level of trauma need intensive help and support, and we need to make sure that they get it, from wherever it may be best available.


Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
Alex, on June 22, 2017 at 11:44 am you said, and I quote: “If your PART-TIME advocacy programme co-ordinator did her job after this child’s court appearance in March, then he wouldn’t have appeared in court again in May.”
So you cast an aspersion on her. It is entirely unwarranted.
Don’t wriggle out, apologise.


Recent Comments by Careful with that Jibe, Eugene

Keeping youth in sight
Rainer, I agree with your point about consultation with the effected youth, and the easy, commonsense way to do it: “To capture the youth’s ideas people employed in Youth Services could survey the kids they work with and schools could consult their students.”
As you observe, that would be likely to produce far better results than “elected members and council staff [meeting] with members of the community”.


Desert town in springtime: new look festival
Sounds pretty good. What a relief after last year’s fiasco.


Youth crisis: broken window of tolerance
A very clear and intelligent presentation of key facts concerning the situations of many of the young people who run wild in our streets at night, Rainer. I hope many Alice residents take the time to read it properly.
I particularly appreciated the clarity of your reference to the role that entry to the police and justice system (and later imprisonment) plays in the formation of the identities of many of these kids (to quote: “Especially for young people who are easily impressionable and grappling with a sense of who they are, the mere experience of imprisonment entrenches their identity as a criminal and further orientates them to recidivism.”)
If only more people realised the importance of this insight, and appreciated the folly of failing to respond sensibly and intelligently to this key contradiction.


Seniors concessions praised, but questions about tiers
Fascinating to hear that seniors who were grandfathered will keep their concessions and receive $500.
Would be even more interesting to know what that means.
Exactly what did the grandfathers do to the seniors? Care to tell us, Sue Shearer?


Bottle shop cops ‘security guards, paid for by the taxpayer’
Neither Paul McCue nor James Smerk understands the role of the police at the TBLs / POSIs outside the takeaway grog outlets.
They are not there for the purpose of policing the outlets, nor for the purpose of proving security for the benefit of the outlets and their customers, although they do some of that incidentally in the course of their main duties.
The reason that police are there is to prevent the trafficking of alcohol by people who have no legitimate place to drink it, and who are intending to drink it in places where it is illegal to do so, such as Aboriginal lands where communities have asked the Liquor Commission to declare areas dry, or town camp leases which the Federal government has declared dry for the wellbeing of vulnerable residents.
These are the sole reasons that police are stationed outside the off-licence liquor outlets.


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