Alex, you must not know the CAALAS Youth Justice Advocacy …

Comment on Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS by Careful with that Jibe, Eugene.

Alex, you must not know the CAALAS Youth Justice Advocacy Programme co-ordinator.
Part-time or not, she’s one person in Alice town who could not ever be accused of not working extremely hard, with great intelligence and diligence, on these issues.
She displays a great sense of responsibility in her work. She also has a demonstrated ability to ask recalcitrant parents the hard questions.

Careful with that Jibe, Eugene Also Commented

Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
Alex, of course one part-time worker with CAALAS is not able to, in your words, “work closely with EVERY SINGLE young person going throughout Central Australian court system, their family, community, lawyer, school and other service-providers to provide the young person with the support they need to get back on track and stay out of trouble”.
That is exactly my point, and why it is wrong for you to lay the blame on that worker, as you did when you wrote “if your PART-TIME advocacy programme co-ordinator did her job after this child’s court appearance in March, then he wouldn’t have appeared in court again in May.”
As I said earlier: That advocacy programme co-ordinator performed her job with great diligence and dedication, and cannot be held to blame for any alleged failure of duty of care, as the case load of such cases far exceeds the ability of one worker to cover even a small proportion of them. She was doing her job very well, covering as many of the cases as she could, but she wasn’t a magician. So your cheap jibe at her reputation is wrongly placed, and you should withdraw it.


Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
Evelyne Roullet, Posted June 22, 2017 at 1:42 pm: Ralph was not talking about where or how the kid should be housed. He was referring to the bigger issue of the huge trauma in his life, caused by the alleged killing of his mother by his father. Kids who experience this level of trauma need intensive help and support, and we need to make sure that they get it, from wherever it may be best available.


Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
Alex, on June 22, 2017 at 11:44 am you said, and I quote: “If your PART-TIME advocacy programme co-ordinator did her job after this child’s court appearance in March, then he wouldn’t have appeared in court again in May.”
So you cast an aspersion on her. It is entirely unwarranted.
Don’t wriggle out, apologise.


Recent Comments by Careful with that Jibe, Eugene

Elferink and Gooda clash over underage marriage
Peter, Posted June 30, 2017 at 2:30 pm: some young girls may resist promised marriage more strongly these days, but I doubt whether some are in a position to do so.
It has been authoritatively reported by youth workers in Alice Springs and Tennant Creek in the last few years that rape of young women is rife in these towns.


I’m not kungka, I’m arelhe
Does anybody know if the hours when the Arrernte words teaching program is held at the Apmere angkentye-kenhe are available somewhere on the net, or anywhere else?
I thought I had seen it advertised for every Wednesday night at 6pm, but this doesn’t appear to be the case?
I have gone there at this time, found it closed, and no notice or info on the door.
Anybody wanna clarify here?


13 year old denied bail after rampage
Original Centralian, Posted June 20, 2017 at 10:12 am: If you’ve been around long, then you can’t have been paying much attention.
Far from being “no more Mr Nice Guy”, Judge Borchers is renowned around Alice for his plain, honest and often tough speaking to offenders and their lawyers.
He has been doing this for the last eleven years; i.e. his whole period as a local magistrate.
A lot of people complain about the members of the judiciary. It would often be more useful if they took the care to read what the judges and magistrates have actually said.


Federal Budget: Stand on your own two feet, NT!
It’s all very well for people to bleat that the NT “has to stand on its own two feet”, but the NT simply doesn’t have anywhere remotely close to the private investment capital or the amount of reliable government revenue income needed to do so.
The relatively piddling amounts of gas royalties (predicted to be only $20 million per year at the most generous estimate, in a decade or two after a decision to begin widespread fracking), and a small growth in income from payroll tax that would start to accrue from an expansion of fracking, wouldn’t pay for much infrastructure.
Nor would fracking royalties begin to clock in in time to do what’s needed now.
Another alternative would be to divert funds away from NTG investment in education, health, shelter and other desperately needed community services, thus descending further into Indigenous disadvantage and further widening the gap, with consequent higher Aboriginal death and disease rates, lower life expectancy, lower education attainments and worse poverty.
The logical consequences of this would also be higher crime and prison costs, the need for even more investment in police, courts and prisons, and a descent further into hell for the NT’s future.
We need to remember that the NT would not have more than a small fraction of its present tourism infrastructure if it wasn’t for previous government investment in building Alice Springs, Yulara, Uluru, Kakadu, Darwin and the Stuart, Barkly, Victoria River and Lasseter Highways and roads like the Mereenie Loop.
There would be no Convention Centres, Casinos, Double Trees, RFDS or Desert Park without the government investment, loans, subsidies and guarantees for these projects.
There is unlikely to be any top rate tourist lodges built in the West and East Macdonnells, or other major new tourist attractions, without similar government support, as there is no sign of the big private money (come on down, Sitzler brothers!) investing in such projects of their own volition.
Therefore Gunner is correct: Like Porky Everingham in the past, we have to look to the Feds and the Commonwealth Grants Commission to underwrite our infrastructure expansion at a much higher level, if the Territory is going to have any chance of growing the local economy.


10 ideas for revitalising the Alice Springs CBD
Robyn is taking a less opportunistic and more constructive, even bi-partisan, line than usual with her suggestions here. Engagement with landlords, and assessment of existing expenditure and maintenance practices are good starting points, if they have not already been done by the NT government and AS Town Council.
The suggestion by Mr/Ms “Free Cash Giveaway” to “encourage [landlords] to not sit on an empty asset by charging higher rates for empty shopfronts” – i.e. by council charging them extra rates if a shop is left vacant for too long – sounds like a very good suggestion.
I also share “Free Cash Giveaway’s” belief that public money should not be contributing to the improvement of private business premises.
I like Robyn’s proposal to allow one-way traffic flow in the whole Mall.
On the other hand, I strongly disagree with her suggestion that the NT government should enrich the white shoe brigade further by buying the old Melanka site. Not only would that use up $10m of the funds that will be needed to construct the art gallery; but it would also have the unedifying effect of having the gallery pearl facing off against the ugliness of the 24 hour servo wasteland, ultra-banal shop fronts, the Thrifty Car rentals yard and the KFC outlet: exactly what is not needed for the ambience of Central Australia’s foremost cultural attraction.
There are other good sites that are already owned by the government that could be used for the national Indigenous art gallery, in or very close to the CBD.
I also like the suggestions coming from many citizens for more shaded (probably multi-story) car parking close to the Mall and the CBD shopping centres, and more diversified indoor play spaces for children in the vicinity of the Mall and the shopping centres. We have to remember that it is too darn hot to do without these facilities for six months of the year.
I don’t believe that we should go overboard and provide every self-styled artist or craftsperson with a free pop-up space without regard to the nature and quality of the work on display. We could wind up with too much very self-indulgent clutter of little interest to most tourists and locals if we don’t watch out. You can revitalize the arts without going to extremes.
In relation to Maya’s thoughts: Malls are not sacred. We can change its name to the Arts and Business Precinct, or whatever. Don’t get hung up on the word Mall. Cars will not interfere with pedestrian activity where there is in actual fact normally very little pedestrian activity anyway. In the six months of the year when it is too hot for most tourists, and most locals are at work or school in our air-conditioned caves, who is going to walk around anyway, Maya?
As for window shopping, we are at home reading the Alice Springs News Online and the New York Times on our Ipads, cooking our gourmet meals with Masterchef on the telly, ordering up new clothes and food processors from China, or watching Game of Thrones until midnight.
Why should shopkeepers risk more broken windows courtesy of alienated drunks or bored children by taking down their shutters after dark if we local residents are not going to go out in the heat of the night to gaze at bohemian creations or great art that we already see on our trip to get coffee from the Red Sands during the day?
Sorry, but more lights are not going to do it. We are all mostly too time poor for that.
And allow coffee shops to remain open till late? Nothing, except the non-appearance of we patrons, is making them shut at 4pm.


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